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Living at home if you are disabled

Living at home if you are disabled doesn't have to be hard. This page explains how to go about accessing the equipment and support you may need.

Making things easier at home

There are lots of things you can do to make day-to-day living easier. You can buy or hire specialist equipment, or get your home adapted to suit your needs. If you rent your home, your landlord has to provide you with extra aids and equipment to help you get the most out of the property.

You may also benefit from some extra help around the house, from a hand with the hoovering to assistance with personal care. The Disability Living Foundation website has lots more information on ways you can make daily life easier.

Accessing equipment and support

Your local council's social work department can arrange for an occupational therapist to assess your needs and recommend equipment and services for you. Your nearest Centre for Independent Living can also offer advice and support, and you can search for organisations who may be able to provide you with support on the Scottish Government's House Key website.

In addition, there may be a voluntary organisation in your area that can provide meals on wheels, transport, help with DIY or other services - contact your local disability information centre to find out.

Paying for equipment and adaptations

Depending on your circumstances, social work may provide you with aids and equipment for free. In addition, you may be entitled to a grant from the council to help pay for adaptations to your home, or you may be able to get financial assistance from social work or your council's care and repair service. The page on help to pay for repairs has more information.

Paying for support at home

The social work department will decide how much you'll need to pay towards any housing support or care services you receive at home. Some care services are free, depending on your situation. You don't have to accept services from the council - you can apply for self-directed support (direct payments) instead, so you can arrange and pay for services yourself. Read the section on paying for care and support to find out more.

What if I can't cope at home?

Social work should do their best to help you stay in your home if this is what you want. However, if you find you can no longer manage, you may need to consider moving into some form of supported accommodation, such as sheltered housing or a care home.

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