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I rent my mobile home - what kind of tenancy do I have?

This page helps you work out what kind of tenancy you have if you rent your mobile home. Your rights depend on the kind of tenancy you have.

How do I find out my tenancy rights?

If you rent a mobile home, your tenancy rights come from the law and from the agreement you have with your landlord. This will either be a written agreement or a verbal agreement. Even if you don't have a written agreement, you still have rights.

Your tenancy rights determine your rights to live in the mobile home - not on the site it's stationed on. Your rights to live on the site are regulated by different laws, and depend on whether or not you live on a protected site. Read the page on renting a pitch to find out what your rights are.

If you are not sure what kind of tenancy you have, or want more information about your rights, speak to an adviser in your local area.

Is my mobile home a 'dwelling house'? 

You may have an assured, short assured or regulated tenancy if you rent a mobile home which is classed as a 'dwelling house'. Your mobile home could be a dwelling house if it:

  • has mains supplies of electricity, water and telephone, and
  • is used as a permanent residence, and
  • is static and cannot be moved, or
  • is so large that it cannot be moved in one piece.

If your mobile home is not classed as a dwelling house then you'll still have rights under the common law.

Do I have a regulated tenancy?

You may have a regulated tenancy if:

  • your mobile home can be classed as a dwelling house, and
  • your tenancy agreement began before 2 January 1989.

As a regulated tenant, you may be able to apply to a rent officer to have a fair rent set. You also have more protection from being evicted than a common law tenant. See the page on regulated tenancies for more information.

Do I have an assured or short assured tenancy?

You may be an assured or short assured tenant if:

  • your mobile home can be classed as a dwelling house, and
  • your tenancy agreement began after 2 January 1989 and before 1 December 2017.

Assured tenants have particularly strong tenancy rights. See the sections on assured tenancies and short assured tenancies to find out your rights.

Do I have a private residential tenancy? 

You may be a private residential tenant if:

  • your mobile home can be classed as a dwelling house, and
  • your tenancy agreement began on or after 1 December 2017.

Find out more about private residential tenancies.

Do I have a common law tenancy?

If your mobile home isn't classed as a dwelling house, you will still have some rights under the common law. Find out more by reading the page on common law tenants' rights.

Problems with tenancies and mobile homes

Sometimes landlords won't accept that you are an assured, short assured or regulated tenant with strong tenancy rights. If you want to assert your rights, eg if you want your landlord to make repairs to your mobile home or if you are fighting eviction, you may have to take court action. It's best to get advice from an adviser in your local area before taking any legal action.

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The important points

  • Your tenancy can be a written agreement or a verbal agreement.
  • You may have an assured or short assured tenancy if you rent a mobile home which is classed as a 'dwelling house'.
  • You may have a regulated tenancy if your mobile home is classed as a dwelling house, and your tenancy began before 2 January 1989.
  • If your mobile home isn't classed as a dwelling house, you will still have some rights under the common law.

If you're still looking for help, try searching, or find out how to contact us

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